Slacker Gods

Things worth thinking about. Seriously.

The Twisted Rope

It is said that a lot of Kemeticism is based on reciprocity. For those of you who don’t know what reciprocity is, it’s commonly defined as “the practice of exchanging things with others for mutual benefit, especially privileges granted by one country or organization to another.” Or in other words, I’ll scratch your back if you scratch mine. I have worded this before in other posts as “we help keep the NTRW full and focused by giving offerings, and in return, they help keep our existence running smoothly”. We help the gods by fulfilling ma’at so that they can survive, and in return, they help make our lives a bit easier (in whatever fashion that that might entail).

Reciprocity is a really interesting concept, and it’s one of my favorite parts of Kemeticism. I love that it’s less about humans prostrating before gods (though you can do that if that’s…

View original post 3,082 more words

Reconstruction is a Lie

All truth, all ma’at.

Peaceful Awakenings: Reflections of Egypt

I’ve been going around and around again on whether or not I can call myself a “reconstructionist”. Whether my standards of truth allow for the sort of truthiness that is required to use that concept at all.

The illusion of reconstruction is that the process results in something that is “what the ancients/the ancestors practiced”. That’s the inner mythology. And that’s the lie. The big one. The imaginary comfortable place that lets people believe that they’re digging in to finding something secretly More True than what they had before.

It’s comforting. It’s comfortable. It’s complacent.

And it’s wrong.

I started out early on sort of acknowledging this, the fact that all I’ve got is my own research, my own interpretation, and what I pick up from other people.

And I write about the problems. I’ve written about knowing the mortar that is used to line the broken blocks that are…

View original post 1,173 more words

Calendric Rhythms

If you’re not already following Peaceful Awakenings, you should.

Peaceful Awakenings: Reflections of Egypt

The basic problem I had with how I was approaching calendar work originally was its literalism. I was compiling lists of festivals and suggestions of festivals, figuring out which ones coincided and how, trying to track down practices for each one, individually, when they hit my threshhold of reaching more thoroughly.

The effect of this was kind of like sticking thumbtacks into very precise points on a piece of plain cardboard and wondering why I didn’t have any sense of the landscape that I was trying to map.

For my new approach, I want to paint the map.

The Egyptian map of the year was divided into three parts plus the Days Upon The Year. Akhet (flood), Peret (planting, literally “emergence”), Shomu (harvest). And these parts were not only a seasonal cycle, but a life-cycle, something likely familiar from many forms of project, the shape of things being done in…

View original post 697 more words

Peace, War and My Druidry

A beautiful post, worth reading.

Treasure in Barren Places

I’m currently having a hiatus from Facebook and other social media (though this post will no doubt automatically end up posted in some of those places), as a result of debates – if you can call them that – on Palestine and Israel.

At the same time, Cadno of the Druid Network has got me thinking about honourable debate. I do not think that honourable debate is actually happening on social media in response to this particular topic, at the moment. Nor do I think it’s happening much in person, although it may be slightly better face-to-face. But just barely.

I say this, writing on the verge of tears, because yesterday my wife SJ (who uses the pronoun ‘they’) and I were sitting in a cafe. SJ had a fancy coffee, I had a very nice cup of tea. SJ, who rarely gets emotional, was upset and trying to explain…

View original post 1,107 more words

In which I rant about cultural misappropriation, cultural differences, and extreme self-sufficiency…

Another post definitely worth reading.

Treasure in Barren Places

I’m not going to post about St Patrick’s Day again this year. My thoughts on that subject are much the same as they were last year (well, maybe a little more pro-Patrick – apparently ignorant Pagans villanising an Irish hero make me like him more!) And if you want to read something thoughtful on that subject, try this year’s Patheos Pagan post on St Paddy’s Day – I don’t agree with every word there, but it’s a good attempt at dispelling myths. Just don’t talk about this ‘All Snakes’ Day’ nonsense in my presence, OK? I’m celebrating my ancestors today, not a fiction that’s been created to make people feel better because they don’t like Christians and are in denial about the strong Catholic presence in the actual real Ireland (not the fairytale one you made up)…

But this post is not about thoughtless people around the world – but…

View original post 1,244 more words