The Elder Scrolls – Peryite

Often viewed as the weakest of the Daedric Princes despite often appearing as a dragon, Peryite oversees the lower planes of Oblivion and keeps order among the low-ranking daedra.  Men and mer know him as the Lord of Pestilence and the Taskmaster, and his spheres of influence cover both those things along with “natural order”.

Peryite is known as having impacting most of the mortals of Nirn, albeit indirectly, since many plagues and pestilences originate with him.  In addition, the “natural order” of Peryite and his followers appears to differ from the “order” imposed by Jyggalag, and also from “order” as mortals understand it.  This leads me to steer away from talking about the concept of “natural order” in this particular post, and more toward what I consider the inherent duality of Peryite.

I am often fascinated with duality (those who know me are thinking, “Really???  I had NO idea.”), and Peryite pleases me in that one overseeing pestilence is also one who can remove it.  The Disease and the Cure, if you will; one hand gives, and the other takes away.  In truth, Peryite’s followers are often afflicted with one disease or another and consider their condition to be a gift rather than a curse…which leads me down a mental path of wondering about wallowing in the Wretched to find the Divine.

I am a Kemetic, and a FlameKeeper, and also working on mindfulness practice – in all of these, the idea that one must recognize and acknowledge reality is key.  Couple this with the tenet, from FlameKeeping, that everything is Divine (you, me, the tree, the rock, and my left shoe) and things begin to get interesting – reality is Divine.  And if reality is Divine, then those things that exist within reality are Divine by default.  This belief must be held by the followers of Peryite, or else why worship the Taskmaster in the first place?  And if held by them, this pinpoints something we have in common, for I am hard pressed to think of anything that is not Divine.

(Actions are, of course, another story.)

For those looking to worship Peryite, incense is a traditional offering (and there is a traditional type that is nigh impossible to make outside of Tamriel).  I suspect, though, that the Lord of Pestilence might be pleased with an acknowledgement of the pitfalls we all face, how they fit into the larger the Divine, and Peryite’s place in that scheme.

Days Upon the Year – Hymn to Aset (belated)

I do not often come to you, Lady of the West.
I have no asks or offers; I need no guide through
Your spheres of influence.

And yet…you are a Presence.
Great of Magic, Who Knows Ra by His Own Name,
When Called, You Will Come.
And I believe, truly believe,
That had I need, you would answer.

With this in mind, and with the Year close to Opening,
I will set out water and bread for your ka,
And say your Name.
That I do not forget.

Days Upon the Year – Hymn to Set

Neb.y:
As your Wind blows, grains of sand scour my skin clean.
I have no need for natron; I am pure, I am pure, I am pure.
As the Lands turn Red with the setting sun,
I am afire with your purpose.

Neb.y, Who Is in the Heart of the Great Houses:
I am Larger than I used to be.
I would Support the Sky for all the Gods,
I would stand at the Tip of the Barque, and
My hair is Red.

Neb.y:
I hold my head High.
Son of Nut, Son of Geb, on This day and
On all days, you are the Beautiful Child.
And I am Hem(t)adpmt.

I am most fortunate.

Days Upon the Year – Hymn to Heru-Wer

You are the Bone-Breaker,
Who Stands and Fights that ma’at be upheld.
Enemy of isfet, Apep will not stand against you.
Overthrower, Overcomer of obstacles,
Your way is through.

One-Eye-Sun-and-One-Eye-Moon,
You are the See-r who Illuminates, the Lord of Flame.
Spread your wings, O Disk!, that my life be shaded from the slings and arrows.
I bring you kyphi and cool water to
Refresh your ka.

Lord of Flame, Great One with Speckled Plumage,
On this Day, I honor you.

Days Upon the Year – Hymn to Ausir

Dua Ausir!

Khenti-Amentiu, King of the Living,
Verdant One.
I bring you cool water, that your ka might be refreshed,
That your cool greenness spill across the living land.
On this day, I honor you, that I might grow.

Dua Ausir!

Qereti come forth from Amenti, He Who is Permanently Benevolent,
Lord of Love.
I bring you bread, that your ka might be nourished,
That your nourishing presence be passed to the Living Ones, to my Beloved Dead.
On this day, I honor you, that I might grow.

Dua Ausir!

Brother of Neb.y, Father of Heru,
Lord of Silence.
I set perfume to travel upon the wind, that your ka might be renewed,
That your Youth touches every Living Thing and makes it whole.
On this day, I honor you, that I might grow.

The Elder Scrolls – Orkey

Orkey, the “Old Knocker” is an adversarial god of the Nordic pantheon, and his worship is recorded as having started during the Aldmeri rule of Atmora.  At that time, it is said that the Atmorans had lifespans as long as the elves and that it was a bargain with Orkey that tied their lives to “the count of winters”.  It is further stated that Orkey actually summoned Alduin the World Eater to devour the lifespans of the Atmorans, and it took an intervention from the ghost of Shor and the life of King Wulfharth to save them.

In my post about Fox, I mentioned that it is likely that this symbol is meant to represent Orkey, and I also stated that Orkey deserved his own post.  He does, and as I’m becoming more interested in the concept of the adversary I thought I could explore him in that vein.

What is an adversary?  Well, strictly defined (because words mean things) an adversary is “one’s opponent in a contest, conflict, or dispute”.  It has a negative connotation, and many people think of the word in that manner, but anyone can be (and is) an adversary at one point or another.  If I take an opposing position to my friend on an issue, or compete against them in a contest, I am an adversary.   If I routinely disagree with someone, our relationship is adversarial.

However: I can, and do, have adversarial relationships that aren’t necessarily negative.  Disagreement and opposition are opportunities for growth and change, and as I believe stagnancy should be avoided, I actively seek out such opportunities.  This means I routinely run into people who take on the role of my adversary…but that doesn’t mean that I dislike those people or wish them to be destroyed (except sometimes).  In fact, in a recent discussion on The Cauldron there were several people who took up an adversarial position to my own and I (mostly) think I benefited and learned from those exchanges.

(That thread is here, if anyone is interested experiencing its glory.)

In a religious sense, the idea of the adversary is often conflated with evil.  In Christianity, for example, Satan is given the epithet of “The Adversary” and is painted to be the epitome of evil, and as not too few modern polytheists were actually brought up with this mindset, it spills over into other mythos as well.  Both of my primary deities, Sekhmet and Set, take on the role of the adversary in the Kemetic mythos and there are a great number of people who are hesitant to approach them because of it.  Neb.y Set is especially associated with evil by non-Kemetics and has been for millennia, as can be seen in his Greco-Egyptian association with Typhon.  And yet, the inhabitants of Ancient Egypt knew that the adversarial role did not directly equate with evil and that Set as adversary was necessary to uphold ma’at.

In thinking about Orkey as a Set-type adversary, I think he can be associated with more than trickery and mortality – as Set is god of the Other, so can Orkey be associated with Other and Foreign things, things that go against the traditional grain and upset the applecart, as it were.  To worship Orkey, then, is to acknowledge the parts of us that long not to follow the crowd, to be independent thinkers, and put our thoughts into practice.  To worship Orkey, or any adversary, is to revere individuality and personal freedoms.

The Elder Scrolls – Owl

I’ve noted previously that the Ancient Nords, during the rule of the Dragon Priests, worshiped nine animal gods – six shown as male, and three as female.  The Owl is said to represent Jhunal, Nordic god of wisdom and knowledge, and the creator of mathematics and language.

Owl mural – Ancient Nord

Interestingly enough, Jhunal appears to have fallen out of favor at some point; he is absent from the modern Nordic pantheon, replaced by Julianos of the Nine (Eight) Divines.  Jhunal is also barely mentioned in written record, aside from a brief description in Varieties of Faith in the Empire, though Vivec does mention him in Sermon Three as one of the eight known worlds.

Unlike many of the supposed “same god, many names” examples that I’ve mentioned in other Elder Scrolls-based posts, Jhunal being Julianos makes a great deal of sense to me: both are hermetic gods, both have the same bailiwick, and Julianos appears just as Jhunal disappears.   Add in the fact that the Nords are quite loyal to their gods and reluctant (mostly) to replace them with Imperial stand-ins, and it makes me wonder if this is a case of the Imperials borrowing from the Nords instead of the other way around.

I’m fond of tying things together, and categorizing them, and so it should surprise no one that I went looking for owls in Ancient Egypt and, of course, found them.  The owl is found in hieroglyphs, specifically as the letter m (Gardiner sign G-17: owl-in-profile ), and is one of the uniliteral signs.  Despite Gardiner calling this owl an ‘Eagle Owl’, the lack of tufts make me think it is a Barn Owl, and Newberry’s article “The Owls in Ancient Egypt” backs me up on this, as do the images below:

Barn owl

Pharaoh eagle owl

While I’ve mentioned that I have no intention of adding Julianos to my personal pantheon, I can’t help but think of the owl as his symbol, and the fact that I am sure that Julianos is a deity in service to ma’at makes me think that some worship of him, and some representation of him, wouldn’t go amiss…but I’ll have to ponder that further.  For now, though, Owl as the Ancient Nords used it stands strong as a representation of language, mathematics, wisdom, and magic, and can be used by modern pagans in that vein.