The Elder Scrolls – Reman

Apotheosis in Tamriel is not limited to Talos, who was Tiber Septim before becoming one of the Nine.  Indeed, Reman Cyrodiil, now called the Worldly God, was known before Ysmir: first as the greatest hero of the Akaviri Invasion of the First Era, and then as the ruler of the Second Empire.  Under his dynasty, the Empire conquered all the kingdoms of Tamriel save for Morrowind…and it was Morrowind, and the Morag Tong, that led to his demise.

(Interestingly, Cyrodiil is not named for Reman as many believe.  Instead, he took Cyrod, the ancient Ayleid name of the heartlands, as his surname.)

There is no obvious cult of Reman these days, but he was worshiped alongside Talos as a conquerer-god, and there is documentation to support this worship dating from as late as the first century of the Third Era.  His rise to godhood stems from the heroic acts of his life – in addition to routing the Akaviri, who called him Dragonborn and swore their loyalty, Reman created the rites associated with ascension to Emperor and is credited with the creation of the Amulet of Kings.  Scholars disagree on whether Reman held or was held by the Amulet, but it none can contest that the process of becoming Emperor is his.

When we look at the cultural god-kings of a prior civilization, it is useful to examine the qualities they embody.  Reman, like so many other deified beings, was a hero who freed Cyrodiil from an invading force and brought prosperity to its people…from the Imperial point of view, anyway.  This raises the question of similarity between practices for the cult of Reman and others – the archaic and classical hero-cults of Greece, for example, or the imperial cults of Rome – and I feel confident in saying that those who desire to worship Reman in such a way will do so with the Worldly God’s blessing.  However, I prefer to think of the qualities not specifically mentioned that nevertheless would have been crucial to his success, and to base my approach to him on those very things.

As an example, consider that Reman is said to have convinced the Akaviri to support him in the founding of the Empire, and the actions documented by historians appear to bear that out.  His powers of persuasion were significant, and the ability to sway others to my cause, to cause them to focus on what I want to accomplish, is something that I use in my work each day.  It should be no wonder, then, that I look to Reman to strengthen my ability to persuade others that what I ask of them is both reasonable and desirable.

(For any who consider me cold for admitting these things, look to the nature of corporate America and understand that the channels I go through to implement processes and programs require this type of action.  I am good at my job.)

For ideas on how to incorporate the worship of Reman into your personal practice, I recommend looking to modern worship of other deified mortals such as Heracles, or Gaius Julius Caesar.

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A Return to My (Gaming) Roots

Once Upon a Time, in days both ancient and forgotten, a woman sought to drag her pop culture paganism into the light by writing about the gods of Tamriel for the period of a year.  That project was never finished.  

<cue ominous and tense music>

In reality, not so dramatic.  There were mitigating factors, not the least of which was my online religious community changing in a way that made me leave it and the subsequent fallout from that.  After all, the stroll through Tamriel was part of a blog project that started in that very community.  And those ancient and forgotten days were actually in 2015 and the writing stopped almost exactly a year ago (last post was on Peryite, on the 26th of August, 2015).

Lately, I’ve been spending more time in The Commonwealth than Tamriel, and it was during a brush with the Children of Atom that I started thinking (again!) about the influence of video games on pop culture paganism…and it made me want to start the project up again!

(or, at least, finish what I started.)

I’m planning to complete the Tamriel project by writing about it, off and on, for the remainder of the year.  I started with ALMSIVI in January 2015 – let’s see if I can make it to Zenithar in December 2016.

Hills of the Horizon: A Defense of Sacred Kingship

Several years ago, I took a trip out into the sticks for a Beltane ritual. Some folks out there needed a May Queen, and through a sequence of coincidences I happened to be both available and qualified. It was a short-term gig in sacral rulership, with my blessing sought to help with the fertility and health of the land. It’s one of the things that I think about when I poke my nose into debates and discussions about sacred kings.

Source: Hills of the Horizon: A Defense of Sacred Kingship

Go and read this.  Seriously.

Empathy for the House of Netjer

Last night, I saw a series of blog posts from members of the House of Netjer (HoN) noting that they are currently in financial difficulties and asking for community support.  The posts serve as a reminder to anyone who forgets that religious organizations are as reliant on financial assistant as individuals, and that tangible resources are necessary for an organism to survive and thrive.

This post is not a call to donate to HoN, although that community needs some support.  It is, instead, a statement of the empathy I feel for its members, for those who believe wholeheartedly in the community and its work, for those who follow its teachings, for those who do senut, and who celebrate festivals according to the Kemetic Orthodox calendar.  For those who believe, and support others in that belief.  For the onion hoers, and the priests.  For those who are hem(t)-netjer.

For those who Trust.  I empathize most with you.

I am Kemetic.  I hold fast to the idea that community must be developed and nurtured and perpetuated.  I hold to the concept of ma’at and that it must be developed and nurtured and perpetuated, lest isfet infest and unmake.  And, I hold to the idea that in ma’at there is community, and in community there is ma’at and that I have a responsibility to Speak in order to continue and improve.

I am not always good at subtle; the first of the Names that came to me was Sekhmet and she is very good at ma’at at any cost.  I am becoming better at this, although parts of me still long for subtlety, to work things out one-on-one, and to address those I believe have forgotten ma’at in private rather than in public.

But the time for that has passed.  It is time for me to Speak Up, to say publicly what I tried to say privately:

The recent actions of the Nisut tell me that the HoN no longer has a head.

To be the God-King, especially in diaspora where no larger civil structures are in place, is not to be a titular head, or a leader in Name only.  In a community where Words Mean Things, where language is heka and heka is language, calling oneself the Nisut implies certain actions…and those actions are not occurring.  Worse yet, to my mind, there has been no owning up to this as far as I can see, save for some throwaway comments at a recent Pagan Event about it being assumed that her attendance at the World Conference of Religions some years ago was related to Kemeticism, followed by a laugh.

Well, yes.

When one is the self-professed leader of a Kemetic organization, when one claims to have been crowned by the gods and given the kingly ka, it is expected that one wear that mantle seriously.  To represent oneself as a leader in another faith while retaining the title of Nisut; to hold a discussion about Kemetic beliefs in a conference suite reserved for a Sosyete; to run from the role one claims to hold to another is shameful.

You, Tamara Siuda, should be ashamed of yourself.

How dare you call yourself their Nisut and not nourish them?  How dare you not open the granaries, and how dare you reduce the community you built – and now seemingly ignore – to the point of begging assistance from the pagan community at large?

For the sake of those who were once your people (and are now something else entirely), I hope your abdication comes soon.

Reblog: Do We Act Justly? Disability, Mental Illness and Vulnerability

“Disabled people are routinely treated as a ‘vulnerable’ group, rather than as a marginalized one. But what if we were included under a social justice banner instead?”

Read the read of the post.

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Naomi Jacobs (AKA Léithin Cluan) tackles a critical topic with the type of openness and clarity that, for me, have come to represent her writing style.  This is a must-read, and a must-think.

The End and the Beginning

I’ve not been writing much of late.

This is not because I don’t want to write; I do, very much.  It’s not because I don’t like the topics I’ve been choosing; I’ve been having a grand time with my pop culture paganism series, even if no one really reads it.  And it’s not because this blog doesn’t fit me anymore; now, more than ever, I find myself bumping into things along my religious path that I want to pick apart and examine here.

The actual reason behind my lack of posting here is complicated, but there is a teal deer version: I stopped posting for The Cauldron Blog Project while trying to sort out whether The Cauldron was still right for me, and after a few weeks and months of both introspection and conversation with some of the members of my religious community (and friends), I decided that it was no longer a good fit.  And so, I’ve resigned as part of the Staff at TC, and I have also left as a member.

The Cauldron has been a huge part of my religious life since early 2010: it was there that I feel I really came into my own as a Kemetic; it was there that I discovered and embraced FlameKeeping; it was there, among the other members, that I refined my own personal practice into something that nurtures and fulfills me.  For those things, not to mention the number of friends I made, I will always be grateful.  But, as people change and grow, their needs changes and mine no longer align with what The Cauldron can provide.

So, this is the end of the TC chapter of my life, but it is also a beginning.  It’s the beginning of a new re-examination period for me, looking at who I am and who I want to be.  It’s the beginning of a new section of road on my religious path.  It’s a chance to start anew and figure out new ways to put together all the bits and pieces, and new ways to poke at them, because the life un-examined is a stagnant life…and you all know how I feel about stagnation.

To those I met on TC, you are a part of who I am, and I will never forget you.  To those joining me with Beginnings of their own, I can’t think of any friends or companions I’d rather have.

Thank you, for everything.

The Elder Scrolls – Peryite

Often viewed as the weakest of the Daedric Princes despite often appearing as a dragon, Peryite oversees the lower planes of Oblivion and keeps order among the low-ranking daedra.  Men and mer know him as the Lord of Pestilence and the Taskmaster, and his spheres of influence cover both those things along with “natural order”.

Peryite is known as having impacting most of the mortals of Nirn, albeit indirectly, since many plagues and pestilences originate with him.  In addition, the “natural order” of Peryite and his followers appears to differ from the “order” imposed by Jyggalag, and also from “order” as mortals understand it.  This leads me to steer away from talking about the concept of “natural order” in this particular post, and more toward what I consider the inherent duality of Peryite.

I am often fascinated with duality (those who know me are thinking, “Really???  I had NO idea.”), and Peryite pleases me in that one overseeing pestilence is also one who can remove it.  The Disease and the Cure, if you will; one hand gives, and the other takes away.  In truth, Peryite’s followers are often afflicted with one disease or another and consider their condition to be a gift rather than a curse…which leads me down a mental path of wondering about wallowing in the Wretched to find the Divine.

I am a Kemetic, and a FlameKeeper, and also working on mindfulness practice – in all of these, the idea that one must recognize and acknowledge reality is key.  Couple this with the tenet, from FlameKeeping, that everything is Divine (you, me, the tree, the rock, and my left shoe) and things begin to get interesting – reality is Divine.  And if reality is Divine, then those things that exist within reality are Divine by default.  This belief must be held by the followers of Peryite, or else why worship the Taskmaster in the first place?  And if held by them, this pinpoints something we have in common, for I am hard pressed to think of anything that is not Divine.

(Actions are, of course, another story.)

For those looking to worship Peryite, incense is a traditional offering (and there is a traditional type that is nigh impossible to make outside of Tamriel).  I suspect, though, that the Lord of Pestilence might be pleased with an acknowledgement of the pitfalls we all face, how they fit into the larger the Divine, and Peryite’s place in that scheme.